Record #488

Date:
03/04/1928
Record Type:
Speech/address
From/By:
Lamar Trotti, Assistant to Colonel Jason S. Joy
Reel:
Reel 5
Frame Start:
5-2410
Frame End:
5-2444
Legacy ID:
491
Legacy Year:
1928
Legacy Index:
Trotti, Lamar - Special Articles
Comments:
Additional text in Transcription.

'The Motion Picture as a Business," written by Trotti to be delivered by Milliken, and by Platten to unidentified group of businessmen.

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Long Description:

The Motion Picture is a business not a game - initially it was "highly competitive ... rough and tumble going ... waste was inevitable and an orgy of carelessness ensued ... Little wonder the banker interests and business men in general looked on the industry as of mushroom origin, and not very safe for investments - as a game and not as a business. "But steadier-minded men came into the business about ten years ago and they began to toss off the rubbish, to refute the cant, to set the house in order. They began to see beyond the noses on their faces and to realize that they had a great business as well as a great art in their hands. They began to tighten up, to fill in the gaps, to add the salt of good sense to the meat of their business. Extravagance, waste, were eliminated as quickly as possible. Common sense asserted itself. The headache days were over. The industry, having obtained the stature of a man, put away childish toys and practices. To call this a game today is absurd." quotes Giannini as saying he's never lost money investing in motion pictures. Claims that with 350,000 people employed in it, one million are dependent on it for their livelihood, and that recently British shoe manufacturers protested about having to install new machinery to make shoes like American movie queens wore. Claims that the effect on sales of American goods was noticed around 1925, and that foreign protest has dated from that realization, rather than from the objections of their producers. Also a cogent defense of block booking as wholesaling, and denunciation of Brookhart's proposal as allowing exhibitors to buy retail at wholesale prices.

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