Record #2303

Date:
03/04/1928
Record Type:
Speech/address
From/By:
Lamar Trotti, Assistant to Colonel Jason S. Joy
Reel:
Reel 5
Frame Start:
5-2483
Frame End:
5-2491
Legacy ID:
2316
Legacy Year:
1928
Legacy Index:
Trotti, Lamar - Special Articles
Comments:
Additional text in Transcription.

"International Unity" written by Trotti "Good motion pictures necessarily have an appeal to all men because good motion pictures, just as good literature and all good art, appeals to the basic human motives. Love of home, love of family, love of children, love of husband or wife, love of parents, worship of a Supreme Being, love of play, love of sport, love of country - these are basic elements in the makeup of all men. They mean as much to the German as they do to the American, as much to the English as they do to the Russian. And, on the screen, these basic motives can be presented to all people. For the first time in history, a means of universal communication has been found. The motion picture film can and does go everywhere. It can and does speak every language. There never before existed any means by which the genius of a people could be expressed and dramatically presented to all other peoples."

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Long Description:

Excerpt from International Unity, by Lamar Trotti, 12-03-1928: The motion picture itself knows no national boundaries. Europe, Africa, America and Asia know the motion picture. It is today as international as the sun itself.For this reason men of every race, of every clime, of every creed, of every school of thought are to be found in Hollywood busily engaged in the important task of supplying motion pictures for world consumption. They have made Hollywood a distinctive, world city - as distinctive in its way as Paris or as Rome. The very name Hollywood has colored the thought of this age. It has given to the world a new synonym for happiness because of all its products happiness is the one in which Hollywood - the motion-picture Hollywood - chiefly interests itself. Herein lies the explanation of Hollywood. The world must be amused. Men must have recreation and relaxation. They must be allowed to forget the grind of everyday existence. There must be a place for workers to rest, to laugh, to cry and to think when the day's job is done. There is an imperative necessity for entertainment of the people and that importance of pictures is measured by this very necessity. Cognizant of the demands upon it Hollywood has very wisely drawn upon the world for its resources in artists and artisans, who, after all, measure the success or failure of motion pictures. The studio personnel is all important. With good actors, good directors, good cameramen, good writers any thing can be accomplished. The greatest creative artists have been attracted to Hollywood that they might have the opportunity for the widest expression. Great numbers of those in key creative positions are direct from supreme accomplishment in other countries. A recent survey of important actors, directors and cameramen in Hollywood showed that sixty were Englishmen, twenty-six were Canadians, twenty-three were Germans, sixteen were Russians, twelve were French, ten were Austrians, eleven were Swedes, seven were Italians, six were Hungarians, four were Japanese, three were Mexicans, three were Danes, and others came from India, Argentina, China, Rumania, Brazil, Poland, Checho-Slovakia, Serbia, Ireland, Switzerland and Turkey.These artists who heretofore were able to reach thousands can now, with this new medium, reach millions. The extension of possible service had commanded them and caused them to cast their lots with the wonder city of the western world.And the product of writers everywhere is sought and used. The list of English authors whose material has been purchased for the screen would fill columns of space including Joseph Conrad, W. Somerset Maugham, Ethel M. Dell, William J. Looke, Cosmo Hamilton, Egerton Castle, A.A. Milne, E.M. Hull, J. Hartley Manners, Gilbert Parker, James M. Barrie, Arnold Bennett, Hall Caine, Philip Gibbs, Jeffrey Farnol, Anthony Hope, Rudyard Kipling, E. Philips Oppenheim, Arthur Wing Pinero, Israel Zangwill, Ouida, A.S.M. Hutchinson, A.M. and C.M. Williamson, E.W. Hornsung, Ian Hay and many others. It is no novel sight in Hollywood to find an Englishman's novel being turned into film continuity by a German scenarist in order that an American girl may be a heroine before scenery designed by an Italian while an Irishman turns the crank of a camera and a Frenchman directs the scene. It is indeed for this very reason that Hollywood may be truly said to be international and that the motion picture already known as the one universal language is truly world-wide in its production as it is in its distribution. Good motion pictures necessarily have an appeal to all men because good motion pictures, just as good literature and all good art, appeals to the basic human motives. Love of home, love of family, love of children, love of husband or wife, love of parents, worship of a Supreme Being, love of play, love of sport, love of country - these are basic elements in the makeup of all men. They mean as much to the German as they do to the American, as much to the English as they do to the Russian. And, on the screen, these basic motives can be presented to all people. For the first time in history, a means of universal communication has been found. The motion picture film can and does go everywhere. It can and does speak every language. There never before existed any means by which the genius of a people could be expressed and dramatically presented to all other peoples.

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