Record #254

Date:
01/03/1925
Record Type:
Correspondence
From/By:
Frederick L. Herron, MPPDA (Foreign Department)
Reel:
Reel 2
Frame Start:
2-1093
Frame End:
2-1109
Legacy ID:
254
Legacy Year:
1925
Legacy Index:
Trademarks

This concerns the registration of trademarks for international distribution following the Pan-American Trademark Convention. The Foreign Managers seek clarification of the situation from Herron, who initially informed them of the Convention (this letter is included), and he in turn asks Connolly for advice. A copy of a Chilean trademark convention is attached.

Keywords

Chile (1), Copyright - international (15), Foreign market (45), Trademarks (2) Show all keywords…

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Long Description:

Meeting - Foreign Managers, 1925. International Trademark Correspondence, March 1925. Herron to Connolly, 03-03-1925: Dear Jack: In reference to the recent Pan-American Convention about which you sent a pamphlet to Courtland and which he in turn passed over to me, I would like to know if this has really been ratified by our government and not merely by our representatives at the Convention. You probably remember that at least once before our members signed such a proposition and the government refused to back them up. Also, I would like to have a number of copies of this as all our people are very much interested in the proposition.In case this has been ratified by the government, how do the member companies go about registering their films under this Convention? I didn't realise that this thing really was so widely important to all of them until I sent out notices which caused a flood of questions immediately to descend upon me.Relative to the situation in Constantinople, it is necessary to register a film in Turkey in order to have any protection against pirated prints. The trade commissioner out there has been doing very good work and has already succeeded in seizing a number of stolen films after the legitimate film has been properly registered with the Turkish authorities. Our member companies are very anxious to find out as soon as possible just what constitutes registering a film there. I have asked Dr. Klein's office to get this information for me and I have no doubt he has written the trade commissioner for it, but I wonder if you couldn't get in touch with the Turkish representative in Washington and see if he can give you any data on this.I think I will be able to come down to Washington next week sometime as I want to talk to Dr. Klein relative to the new department, but will see you before I have my talk with him, as I want to get the whys and wherefores of his balling up this matter straightened out. Very sincerely, [Herron] [Connolly to Herron, 03-11-1925] Dear Major Herron: Further in reference to your letter of March 3rd relative to the Pan-American Trademark Convention, before this Convention can be proclaimed and put in force, six of the nations signing must ratify it. At the present time, only five have done so but it is expected that Colombia will ratify it within the next year. At the earliest, it will be at least one year before it is put into practice.When the convention is put in force, the procedure will be to secure American registration through the United States Patent Office and then to apply for registration, through an international bureau, for registration in each of the countries desired. This bureau will forward the applications to the countries in question and registration will be effected in accordance with the law in these countries. In this way, marks so registered will be on an equal footing with the marks registered by citizens of that country. The present system provides that an application be made for international registration based on the registration in the home country. A single fee was paid for this registration and the mark was supposed to be registered in all countries signing the Convention of 1910. However, this is not satisfactory as in most of these nations, marks registered in the home country have a better legal status than these international marks. The new Convention will, by the payment of separate fees in each country, put the international marks on an equal footing with those registered directly in the country.I am enclosing two pamphlets on trademark information which might be of interest to you. Very truly yours, [Jack S. Connolly]

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